The Sun is trying to kill us all

Earlier
Ten spacecraft, from ESA's Venus Express to NASA's Voyager-2, felt the effect of a solar eruption as it washed through the solar system while three other satellites watched, providing a unique perspective on this space weather event.
Tue, Aug 15, 2017
Source: Solar Storm
A total solar eclipse happens somewhere on Earth about once every 18 months. But because Earth's surface is mostly ocean, most eclipses are visible over land for only a short time, if at all. The total solar eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017, is different -- its path stretches over land for nearly 90 minutes, giving scientists an unprecedented opportunity to make scientific measurements from the ground.
Mon, Aug 14, 2017
Source: Solar Storm
On Sept. 30, 2014, multiple NASA observatories watched a failed solar eruption. Because scientists had so many eyes on the event, they were able to explain how the Sun's magnetic landscape shredded its own eruption.
Fri, Aug 11, 2017
Source: Solar Storm
It is known that the sun's corona is roughly 100 times hotter than its photosphere -- the sun's visible layer. The reason for this mysterious heating of the solar coronal plasma, however, is not yet entirely understood. A research team in India has developed a set of numerical computations to shed light on this phenomenon, and present this week in Physics of Plasmas, analysis examining the role of chaotic magnetic fields in potential heating mechanisms.
Wed, Aug 09, 2017
Source: Solar Storm
As the hullabaloo surrounding the Aug. 21 total eclipse of the sun swells by the day, an expert says a petroglyph in New Mexico's Chaco Canyon may represent a total eclipse that occurred there a thousand years ago.
Wed, Aug 09, 2017
Source: Solar Storm

Studying the Sun's atmosphere with the total solar eclipse of 2017

A total solar eclipse happens somewhere on Earth about once every 18 months. But because Earth’s surface is mostly ocean, most eclipses are visible over land for only a short time, if at all. The total solar eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017, is different — its path stretches over land for nearly 90 minutes, giving scientists an unprecedented opportunity to make scientific measurements from the ground.

Source:: Studying the Sun’s atmosphere with the total solar eclipse of 2017

      

Chaotic magnetic field lines may answer the coronal heating problem

It is known that the sun’s corona is roughly 100 times hotter than its photosphere — the sun’s visible layer. The reason for this mysterious heating of the solar coronal plasma, however, is not yet entirely understood. A research team in India has developed a set of numerical computations to shed light on this phenomenon, and present this week in Physics of Plasmas, analysis examining the role of chaotic magnetic fields in potential heating mechanisms.

Source:: Chaotic magnetic field lines may answer the coronal heating problem