The True State of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Internal Exposure Concealed

By Corbett

by Yagasaki Katsuma / The Asia-Pacific Journal / May 15, 2016 Yagasaki Katsuma, emeritus professor of Ryukyu University, has been constantly sounding the alarm about the problem of internal exposure related to nuclear weapons testing and nuclear electricity generation. Since the explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), he has drawn on his expertise to conduct field research, and to support those who evacuated to Okinawa. We asked … Continue reading

Source:: The True State of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Internal Exposure Concealed

      

Risk assessment of radioisotope contamination for aquatic living resources in and around Japan

By Corbett

via PNAS / April 2016 Significance Quantification of contamination risk caused by radioisotopes released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is useful for excluding or reducing groundless rumors about food safety. Our new statistical approach made it possible to evaluate the risk for aquatic food and showed that the present contamination levels of radiocesiums are low overall. However, some freshwater species still have relatively high risks. We also suggest … Continue reading

Source:: Risk assessment of radioisotope contamination for aquatic living resources in and around Japan

      

Other Suns got the right spin

Astrophysicists have for the first time measured the rotation periods of stars in a cluster nearly as old as the Sun and found them to be similar. It turns out that these stars spin around once in about twenty-six days — just like our Sun. This discovery significantly strengthens what is known as the solar-stellar connection, a fundamental principle that guides much of modern solar and stellar astrophysics. This principle — that the Sun is a star — was only proved in the 19th century when distances to the nearest stars were measured.

Source:: Other Suns got the right spin

      

Space mission first to observe key interaction between magnetic fields of Earth and sun

Physicists have now provided the first major results of NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, including an unprecedented look at the interaction between the magnetic fields of Earth and the sun. The article describes the first direct and detailed observation of a phenomenon known as magnetic reconnection, which occurs when two opposing magnetic field lines break and reconnect with each other, releasing massive amounts of energy.

Source:: Space mission first to observe key interaction between magnetic fields of Earth and sun

      

Swept up in the solar wind

The sun’s outer layer, the corona, constantly streams out charged particles called the solar wind. But it’s not the kind of wind you can fly a kite in. Even the slowest solar wind can reach speeds 700,000 mph. And while scientists know a great deal about solar wind, the source and causes of the slow wind remain mysterious.

Source:: Swept up in the solar wind

      

Star with different internal driving force than the sun

A star like the sun has an internal driving in the form of a magnetic field that can be seen on the surface as sunspots. Now astrophysicists have observed a distant star in the constellation Andromeda with a different positioning of sunspots and this indicates a magnetic field that is driven by completely different internal dynamics.

Source:: Star with different internal driving force than the sun