Record breaking rainfall causes deadly Hiroshima landslides, Japan

Record breaking rainfall caused flooding and deadly landslides in the Hiroshima city early Wednesday, August 20, 2014. According to latest reports [21:00 UTC today], 39 people were confirmed dead and 7 were still missing.Hiroshi Ikeya, a landslide expert at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, told NHK that Hiroshima’s geology, consisting of highly water-retentive soil, makes the city particularly prone to such disasters.”The damage was extensive because of intense rain, extremely fragile slopes and the disaster hitting in the dead of night. Mudslides, floodwater, broken trees and debris flowed down the hill, smashing into houses.”Dreadful scenes after #landslide hits #Japan #Hiroshima following over 200mm rain http://t.co/7zDxIsiY… »

Source: Solar News

Zooming in on star formation regions in the southern Milky Way

The latest image released by ESO shows two dramatic star formation regions in the southern Milky Way. The first is of these, on the left, is dominated by the star cluster NGC 3603, located 20 000 light-years away, in the Carina–Sagittarius spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy. The second object, on the right, is a collection of glowing gas clouds known as NGC 3576 that lies only about half as far from Earth.NGC 3603 is a very bright star cluster and is famed for having the highest concentration of massive stars that have been discovered in our galaxy so far. At the centre lies a Wolf–Rayet multiple star system, known as HD 97950. Wolf–Rayet stars are at an advanced stage of stellar evolution, and start off with around 20 times the mass of the Sun. But,… »

Source: Solar News